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Weatherballs

As the planet heats up, we sit around talking and doing nothing. Explain - Comment - Times Online

But perhaps the lasting legacy of 1976 was that it was the first time that people began to take climate change seriously. Until then scientists had been making dire noises about something going terribly wrong with the weather, but it seemed so . . . well, academic. After all, what was there really to worry about when the 1970s had been mostly the usual mix of cold winters and disappointing summers? So a sensationally hot and dry summer in 1975 came as a rude shock. It could have been written off as a one-off freak, but two successive summers of blistering heat stretched coincidence too far.
No, it was clear to everyone in 1976 that something was untoward.

Rubbish - back in the 1970s there were fears of an impending Ice Age - look at National Geographic, November 1976 article which basically is non committal on which way the climate might turn next - good link well worth an explore -

Scientists agree that we can expect increasingly hot and prolonged heatwaves as climate change bites deep.

Not a hint of any scientist forecasting anything different or actually saying they aren't confident enough in the models to able to forecast as to what to expect.

We may yet find ourselves in the position of Californians, who suffer power blackouts in the summer because of the huge energy demands from air-conditioning.

Those right wind sceptics at the BBC blame something different -

BBC News | AMERICAS | California blackout: Why it happened
...The problems stem from an ambitious - but poorly executed - plan to deregulate the energy industry.

Oh well - facts mustn't get in the way, we are facing disaster!

So, how many more record-breaking heatwaves will it take before we start to take climate change seriously? And when will the Government take the lead? When will it force all new buildings to have their own power generators — solar panels, wind turbines, whatever — and compulsory rain traps to collect rainwater?...We need to be more aware of how much carbon dioxide we use. ... While we’re at it, impose a special carbon tax on airline fares because aviation fuel is untaxed. And tinkering around with a few wind turbines is useless; we need a huge, concerted effort to change our ways.

You said it - useless!

In the intense heatwave of August 2003, more than 2,000 people are reckoned to have died, but still it made no difference. How many more deaths will it take before climate change is taken seriously?

Paul Simons writes the Weather Eye column for The Times

It is strange this 2000 deaths figure - see http://www.statistics.gov.uk/downloads/theme_health/HSQ25.pdf for a full article - the striking quote I noticed was: Excess mortality was much greater than that observed with previous heat waves in the UK. In London it was estimated that the 2003 heat wave was associated with a 42 per cent increase in mortality, compared to an excess of 16 per cent in 1995 and 15 per cent in 1976
Isn't that damning - 1976 which was a long hot summer, not many died but nearly thirty years later they are dropping like flies - what does that tell you about all the wonderful advances we have made in care for our old and sick?

Comments

Check out 1947's roller-coaster weather.

http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~taharley/1947_weather.htm

The second worst winter of the century (after 1962-63), floods when the snow melted in March, followed by as scorching a summer as we're having now.

Last time I was in California for business, I stopped by a walgreens by the motel for a quick frozen dinner. Since I was wearing shorts I could feel the cold air rolling down from the OPEN frozen food wall. They don't have doors in CA because when you open and close the door, it momentarily frosts up inside, and not being able to see the packages cuts down on "impulse buying."

They also had prominent signs saying they were complying with energy conservation by only having half their store lighting on. (However all the lighting of the frozen food wall was ON.)

That idiotic use of electricity, combined with simplistic/idiotic ideas about market forces, and nimby greens caused the power shortages. Not global warming.


I view the whole Global Warming doctrine as a pile of steaming ordure. But if anyone wants to take its absurd "climate models" seriously, they should note that the warming they predict is largely confined to winter nights.

What farging nitwits, the data for the climate model they produced is filled with apples and oranges of dissimilar information, extrapolated to their own ideological benefit.

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