« Badger, Badger, Badger | Main | Keep Paying the Danegeld »

Pay to Display?

Waterstone's admit charging to promote books | Uk News | News | Telegraph
For £45,000 per book, Waterstone's, the document suggested, would place six titles in windows, front-of-house displays and in a national advertising campaign.

For £25,000, the chain allegedly offered to feature a title in a front-of-store bay as a "gift book", and at tills. For £17,000, a book, it was claimed, would be displayed as one of two titles billed as the "offer of the week" for one week in the run-up to Christmas.

A payment of £7,000 would allegedly ensure a book was promoted as a Paperback of the Year and be mentioned in newspaper advertisements, while £500 would see a book appear in Waterstone's Christmas gift guide, complete with a bookseller review.

Oh grow up! Have journalists never heard of slotting fees or allowances? The money that manufacturers have to pay supermarkets to get their products on the shelf, and how much they pay determines where on the rack they are? For many supermarkets it is as an important an source of revenue as the actual sales receipts. Is it because books should be holy and untainted by sordid commerce or is it that the art grad journalists are bog ignorant of commerce?

Comments

"Property owner charges for use of his assets. Shock Horror!"

"Publishers made to pay for marketing - Scandal!"

About the only thing scandalous about this is tat it's the Torygraph that's punting the "story". Of all the MSM one would expect that organ to at least understand business and capitalism.

"Is it because books should be holy and untainted by sordid commerce or is it that the art grad journalists are bog ignorant of commerce?"


I'll take "bog ignorant" for $200, Alex.

"Bog" being a small smelly place lit by a single bulb hanging from a wire and with a damp roll of TP hanging from a string - not a swampy field in Scotland.

"Is it because books should be holy and untainted by sordid commerce or is it that the art grad journalists are bog ignorant of commerce?"

I expect these are the same art grad journalists that would look snootily down their noses at anyone reading 'The DaVinci Code', while wondering why Booker Prize winners don't sell by the truckload.

Wonder how they are all taking the news of Sir Rushdie's honour...?

Is not this the way that competition dies.
How many authors would never be published if they have to pay for space.
It's not like TV where a very limited publication space is accepted.

Post a comment