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The case for hanging EU bureaucrats

Butchers vow to fight planned EU ban on Scottish mince - The Daily Record

Brussels penpushers want to end the sale of properly aged beef mince - to prevent foodies poisoning themselves with raw steak tartare.

Farmers and butchers say the move will push up prices and make the family favourite less tasty.

And food bug expert Hugh Pennington says the new rules won't make beef any safer.

The new health rules state meat used to make mince should be cut less than six days after an animal's slaughter.

The FSA opposed the moves but have admitted defeat and are now in the process of informing butchers and food processors that the new rules must be implemented immediately.

It's feared the regulations will also push prices up as meat has to be processed more quickly - or binned if it misses the six-day limit.

The changes have been approved to protect consumers, mainly French, from eating potentially contaminated steak tartare - made from ground up raw steak mixed with egg and herbs.

The plans are the brainchild of health commissioner Markos Kyprianou, who quit last month. He outlined his crackdown in 2006 in the catchily titled Annex III, Section V, Chapter III, point 2 ( B ) to Regulation (EC) No 853/2004.

On his official EU webpage, Kyprianou said: "What I want to achieve is a Europe where all citizens, whether in northern Finland or in Sicily, in Porto or in Paphos, know and appreciate that they can enjoy food confident they will be safe, and that their rights will be well protected."

Tell Eurocrats to go hang - this reheated idea is still pure mince - Scotsman.com News
Meat, particularly beef, is hung to improve both its texture and taste. Enzymes in the meat soften the muscle tissue, making it both tender and more flavoursome, but this takes time and it has to be done under refrigeration. Many butchers survive the pressure from the supermarkets simply because they still prepare their meat in a traditional way and refuse to slap it on the counter only days, or hours, after slaughter.

Just compare two similar cuts of meat, one from the cheap end of the supermarket range and one from a local high-street butcher, and taste the difference.

Beef in Scotland is produced to be eaten after it is cooked, particularly mince. After three weeks of hanging, there may be bacteria in the meat, but this will be eradicated by the cooking process. Well-hung Scotch beef mince is not designed to be eaten raw.

I have no problem with people in eastern Europe who want to eat it raw, but we should not have to change the way we prepare meat just because of the way they want to eat it. It is a typically bureaucratic response from the EU. Rather than telling those who like steak tartare that they eat it at their own risk, we have to change our ways to fit in with them.

Hang'em all, for at least three weeks.

After drowning them in sloe gin...Winemaker faces £30,000 bill for eurobottles - Telegraph

The EU says it is illegal to sell his nine liqueurs - including bramble, walnut, ginger, sloe and strawberry - in his traditional 37.5cl bottles. They must measure 35cl instead.

Comments

"On his official EU webpage, Kyprianou said: "What I want to achieve is a Europe where all citizens, whether in northern Finland or in Sicily, in Porto or in Paphos, know and appreciate that they can enjoy food confident they will be safe, and that their rights will be well protected."

What's safe about eating raw beef with raw eggs?

Let's string him up.

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