« Naughty Girl Wendy Blames SNP For Spanking Her | Main | Bin Bugs Don't Work - And Defra Knew it in 2006 »

Filthy Hospitals - No Change There

NHS trusts fail to meet hygiene standards - Telegraph

More than a quarter of health trusts in England are failing to meet basic hygiene standards, official figures show today.

The Healthcare Commission reports that no improvement has been made on a year ago.

In total, 103 out of 391 trusts admitted they did not achieve the minimum requirements, brought in by the Government to help combat the hospital superbugs, MRSA and Clostridium difficile.

More than 8,000 deaths were related to MRSA and C. diff.

Still the good news from the figures is that 93.2% do comply with the requirement to "challenge discrimination, promote equality and respect human rights."

And over in the private sector you can look up the MRSA and Clostridium difficile infection rates as well - and as far as I can see they are both a big round zero for 2007 - and they even give handy hints as how they achieve it. May I suggest someone from the NHS reads them. MRSA Info Clostridium difficile Info

Comments

Great news - at least we know that the people who die from superbugs will be from different ethnic and social groups.

What steps will be taken to ensure no ethnic group is disproportionately represented in the MRSA and e coli statistics? And why isn't it a human right to have a clean hospital bed?

Don't worry folks, they're spending shedloads on nicotine replacement therapy. It'll save literally millions of ficticious, fabricated statistical lives; even though the fail-rate is consistently around 94%. It may be shite, but it's fashionable. Right on comrades!

Don't worry folks, they're spending shedloads on nicotine replacement therapy. It'll save literally millions of ficticious, fabricated statistical lives; even though the fail-rate is consistently around 94%. It may be shite, but it's fashionable. Right on comrades!

On another blog, by a doctor, I asked if NHS did not wash its patients to lessen contamination risks, as presumably done in private sector. I was rebuked with these two defenses:

1. Incoming patients at private facilities are of a higher socio-economic stratum, and cleaner (i.e., no NHS does not and non-NHS does not need to)

2. Patients come in with microbes in nose, mouth, and throat so even if we did routinely wash them the effect would be minimal (i.e. no the NHS does not swab mouthwash or whatever to reduce such microbes before surgery [presumably unless oral surgery])

Hmm...

Post a comment