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Bulb Mania

BBC NEWS | Magazine | The bulb hoarders

The government wants your old-fashioned energy-hungry incandescent tungsten light bulb gone, and gone soon. But some people are willing to go to great lengths to hang onto the lights they love.

The 150w, in particular, is seriously rare. They're gone from Tesco. Morrisons have already chosen to ditch them, with 100w to follow in the autumn and 60w next year.

Campaigners see the hoarding of bulbs in a dim light. "It's a bad idea," says Ben Stewart of Greenpeace.

Right, that's a a box of them going on the shopping list. Not sure why I need them but if Greenpeace says it is a bad idea history shows it normally isn't.

Comments

Damn! I didn't think the results of that creativity course would kick in so soon. But they have; for I see a brilliant business opportunity here.

Africa is always a few years behind the rest of the world when it comes to stuff like this, so I'm guessing bright bulbs will still be available down here for some time.

I'm pretty sure I can get a shipping container booked, and I reckon I can also get a shedload of 100W bulbs. All I need now is an agent in the UK prepared to distribute the things.

All well and good till they make them illegal. Don't think that'll happen? It's getting pushed through in New Zealand as we speak.

And, of course, if they make incandescent light bulbs illegal to sell, there will be no money to be made in them.

Just ask any drug dealer how badly he's been going since prohibition.

The Remittance Man - "All well and good till they make them illegal."

Ah-hah! Finally someplace where our US eedjuts are ahead of EU fools! They`ve passed laws in States which will ban incandescents by 2010, and a national ban to go into effect by 2012! Whee!

No word on how this will affect what may be the world's most famous lightbulb -
*Centennial Light* still burning after 107 years in service

Mind you, it will also be illegal to throw them into the trash - mercury, you know. And cleaning up if one breaks may, if anyone notices, cost US $2000 to clean up, albeit folowing EPA-posted rules only means basically moving out of your home for a few days. But no fear, the US will have at least two places (both roughly 1500 miles from me, but still) where you can hand-deliver them to recyclers.

I do love the way that the fact that CFL's can't be thrown away with the regular rubbish (trash for those of us using the President's English) is more or less totally glossed over. One sentence in the BBC article.

You want a business idea to invest in? Start working out how to remove mercury contamination from groundwater. Should take off in 5-10 years,

I do love the way that the fact that CFL's can't be thrown away with the regular rubbish (trash for those of us using the President's English) is more or less totally glossed over. One sentence in the BBC article.

You want a business idea to invest in? Start working out how to remove mercury contamination from groundwater. Should take off in 5-10 years.

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