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Words made to be used by agrestic oppugnant bloggers as they vilipend our olid leaders

How you can help to save some cherished words from oblivion - Times Online

Dictionary compilers at Collins have decided that the word list for the forthcoming edition of its largest volume is embrangled with words so obscure that they are linguistic recrement.

Collins has agreed that words will be granted a reprieve if evidence of their popularity emerges before February, when the word list is finalised.

Some of the words heading for extinction:

Abstergent Cleansing or scouring

Agrestic Rural; rustic; unpolished; uncouth

Apodeictic Unquestionably true by virtue of demonstration

Caducity Perishableness; senility

Caliginosity Dimness; darkness

Compossible Possible in coexistence with something else

Embrangle To confuse or entangle

Exuviate To shed (a skin or similar outer covering)

Fatidical Prophetic

Fubsy Short and stout; squat

Griseous Streaked or mixed with grey; somewhat grey

Malison A curse

Mansuetude Gentleness or mildness

Muliebrity The condition of being a woman

Niddering Cowardly

Nitid Bright; glistening

Olid Foul-smelling

Oppugnant Combative, antagonistic or contrary

Recrement Waste matter; refuse; dross

Vilipend To treat or regard with contempt

Comments

Aren't they all names of Wiltshire villages?

Why does it matter whether they're in Collins dictionary or not?

Quite, Andrew, as long as they remain in proper dictionaries and upon the internet, why should we care that a recremental, niddering excuse for a dictionary that vilipends the majesty of the English language absterges them from its olid offering? A malison upon their house.

Read this piece on yesterday's morning trawl through the blogs and later was deep in Charles Stross' new heavyweight philosophical SF book 'Anathem' - and there on p.651 - compossible, used correctly, too.
Spooky, or what?

Read this piece on yesterday's morning trawl through the blogs and later was deep in Charles Stross' new heavyweight philosophical SF book 'Anathem' - and there on p.651 - compossible, used correctly, too.
Spooky, or what?

what's the big deal?

Old English, Middle English and all those words we use but others dont...It is an oral tradition passed mother to child, WO2 to grunt for 100s if not 1000s of years.

Keep our words out of Collins so we can recognise native speakers.

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