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Heatwave alert and advice to drink cool water from the Met Office

Take a siesta to beat the British heat - Times Online
TAKE cover: heat waves are on the way. Despite the unusually cold winter the government has drawn up a national emergency plan to deal with the rising risk of extreme hot weather linked to climate change.
Under the plan, people in areas hit by heat waves will be advised to stay indoors during the middle of the day — in effect, taking a siesta — and change out of formal clothing such as suits and avoid hot food.
They will also be advised to stay cool by using fans, shading windows and drinking lots of water.
On Friday the Met Office hosted a private conference for governmental agencies and public health experts, who discussed the emergency plan.
It envisages setting up a national response centre overseen by the Cabinet Office whenever a prolonged heatwave threatens. This would send out public alerts and co-ordinate responses by councils, local authorities and emergency services. The Met Office also plans to work with GPs to directly target those most at risk from prolonged heat. This would include the elderly and people with medical conditions such as circulatory and heart disease.
They would be issued in advance with personalised heat wave health packs by their GPs. Then, when a heat wave threatened, they would get automated warning telephone calls reminding them...

The Met Office has a service to warn people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) when it is cold and horrible that they might be feeling extra poorly, something most coughers and splutterers can work out for themselves fairly easily. They charge the NHS £18 a patient per winter and £10,000 per area to set up. No wonder they want to expand the role of health forecasting.

Comments

"the government has drawn up a national emergency plan to deal with the rising risk of extreme hot weather linked to climate change"

...and it will work about as well as all their other plans -- assuming, that is, that it will ever have to be used at all.

My bet: it won't be used more than once in the next five years.

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