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Scotch Politicians Can Go Hang As They Ban Free Speech

Singing National Anthem 'could be illegal' - Scotsman.com News

FOOTBALL supporters could be jailed for singing God Save the Queen or Flower of Scotland under the SNP's new law to crack down on sectarianism.
Making the sign of the cross or singing Rule Britannia could also be regarded as an offence under certain circumstances once the legislation comes into force next football season.
Community safety minister Roseanna Cunningham yesterday said that such songs and gestures could be regarded as offensive acts.
Her comments led to opposition politicians claiming that the new law could criminalise people for singing the National Anthem or crossing themselves. Mr Lamont said: "I am now very concerned about how this legislation might be interpreted. For example, if you are a republican Scot, could you then claim that someone singing God Save The Queen is a sectarian attack on you? If you are English, could you then claim that someone singing Flower of Scotland is a sectarian attack on you?
Ms Cunningham said that the aspect of the law designed to tackle internet hate crimes would also apply to offensive graffiti, T-shirts, posters and recorded speech.

So the Scotch are introducing a law to deal with the problem of the Fenian Scum Celtic Supporters vs The Billy Boy Ranger Fans being rude to each other but they can't resist sneaking in a general clause whcih doesn't just deal with football :


Offensive Behaviour at Football and Threatening Communications (Scotland) Bill
[AS INTRODUCED]

5 Threatening communications
(1) A person commits an offence if—
(a) the person communicates material to another person, and
(b) either Condition A or Condition B is satisfied.
(2) Condition A is that—
(a) the material consists of, contains or implies a threat, or an incitement, to carry out a seriously violent act against a person or against persons of a particular description,
(b) the material or the communication of it would be likely to cause a reasonable person to suffer fear or alarm, and
(c) the person communicating the material—
(i) intends by doing so to cause fear or alarm, or
(ii) is reckless as to whether the communication of the material would cause fear or alarm.
(3) For the purposes of Condition A, where the material consists of or includes an image (whether still or moving), the image is taken to imply a threat or incitement such as is
mentioned in paragraph (a) of subsection (2) if—
(a) the image depicts or implies the carrying out of a seriously violent act (whether actual or fictitious) against a person or against persons of a particular description
(whether the person or persons depicted are living or dead or actual or fictitious),
and
(b) a reasonable person would be likely to consider that the image implies the carrying out of a seriously violent act against an actual person or against actual
persons of a particular description.
(4) Subsection (3) does not affect the generality of subsection (2)(a).
(5) Condition B is that—
(a) the material is threatening, and
(b) the person communicating it intends by doing so to stir up religious hatred.
(6) It is a defence for a person charged with an offence under subsection (1) to show that the
communication of the material was, in the particular circumstances, reasonable.
(7) A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1) is liable—
(a) on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years, or to a fine, or to both, or
(b) on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both.
6 Section 5: interpretation
(1) Subsections (2) to (5) define expressions used in section 5.
(2) “Communicates” means communicates by any means (other than by means of unrecorded speech); and related expressions are to be construed accordingly. Offensive Behaviour at Football and Threatening Communications (Scotland) Bill 5
(3) “Material” means anything that is capable of being read, looked at, watched or listened to, either directly or after conversion from data stored in another form.
(4) “Religious hatred” means hatred against—
(a) a group of persons based on their membership (or presumed membership) of—
(i) a religious group (within the meaning given by section 74(7) of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7)),
(ii) a social or cultural group with a perceived religious affiliation, or
(b) an individual based on the individual’s membership (or presumed membership) of a group mentioned in either of sub-paragraphs (i) and (ii) of paragraph (a).
(5) “Seriously violent act” means an act that would cause serious injury to, or the death of, a person.
(6) In subsection (4)—
(a) “membership”, in relation to a group, includes association with members of that group, and
(b) “presumed” means presumed by the person making the communication.

General
7 Sections 1(1) and 5(1): offences outside Scotland
(1) As well as applying to anything done in Scotland, sections 1(1) and 5(1) also apply to anything done outside Scotland by—
(a) a British citizen, a British Overseas Territories citizen, a British National (Overseas) or a British Overseas citizen,
(b) a person who under the British Nationality Act 1981 (c.61) is a British subject,
(c) a British protected person within the meaning of that Act, or
(d) a person who is habitually resident in Scotland.
(2) Section 5(1) also applies to a communication made by any person from outside Scotland if the person intends the material communicated to be read, looked at, watched or
listened to primarily in Scotland.
(3) Where an offence under section 1(1) or 5(1) is committed outside Scotland, the person committing the offence may be prosecuted, tried and punished for the offence—
(a) in any sheriff court district in which the person is apprehended or in custody, or
(b) in such sheriff court district as the Lord Advocate may direct, as if the offence had been committed in that district (and the offence is, for all purposes incidental to or consequential on the trial and punishment, deemed to have been committed in that district).

Which as a British Subject seems to me would make it illegal for me to post this:


"He was brought before a firing squad, and in this manner he died as tyrants should, and was hung up by his heals. A fitting, and glorious end!".

Illegal? Because that is what I hope and want to happen to tyrants,;

A person commits an offence if—
..the person communicates material to another person,
..the material consists of, contains or implies a threat, or an incitement, to carry out
a seriously violent act against a person or against persons of a particular
description, where the material consists of or includes an image (whether still or moving), the image is taken to imply a threat or incitement such as is
mentioned in paragraph (a) of subsection (2) if
(a) the image depicts or implies the carrying out of a seriously violent act (whether actual or fictitious) against a person or against persons of a particular description
(whether the person or persons depicted are living or dead or actual or fictitious), and
(b) a reasonable person would be likely to consider that the image implies the carrying out of a seriously violent act against an actual person or against actual persons of a particular description.

“Communicates” means communicates by any means (other than by means of unrecorded speech);
“Material” means anything that is capable of being read, looked at, watched or listened to, either directly or after conversion from data stored in another form.

Comments

I used to weep because I thought people who wrote law like this knew not what they did.

Now I'm just angry. "A la lanterne les aristos!"

Have linked.....

Have linked......

Not too sure if first comment got through - if it did, please delete this one!

A similar thing's happened in N. Ireland.
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/northern-ireland/man-convicted-of-menacing-duprsquos-gregory-campbell-with-post-on-facebook-16015107.html

It looks as if it will be delayed, Wee Eck has decided not to force it through using the large SNP majority.

'Tory chief Annabel Goldie added: "The more realistic timetable will allow the obvious failings of the Bill to be looked at." '

They don't need all this ridiculous wordy pish.

All they need is:

1. Decree all state primary schools to be non-denominational and devoid of reglious symbolism of any kind.

2. Decree all state secondary schools to be non-denominational and devoid of reglious symbolism of any kind.

3. Wait a few years.

Problem solved.

Passing stupid laws about the RESULTS of sectarian separatism in society, while doing nothing about its CAUSE, is completely insane.

It's true that enacting (1) and (2) require the government to grow a pair and tell the RC Church where to shove itself, but imho that's a feature, not a bug.

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