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Guardian Lofty Lies

Force energy companies to insulate UK homes, climate advisers say | Environment | The Guardian
Energy companies should be forced to insulate every empty loft and cavity wall in the UK within four years, say the government's climate change advisers.
In the UK, 10m (43%) of all lofts remain unlagged ...

No, the report actually estimates 10m have less than 125mm of loft insulation. That is about five inches. The old standard loft insulation was 4 inches or 100mm. How many of those 10 million houses have just not upgraded their insulation is not stated. Maybe the marginal improvement in energy efficiency is not seen worthwhile by the householder in terms of trouble or cost.

But whatever the Guardian report is wrong.

Comments

My loft only has 4" of insulation.

I got someone in (might have been from the council) because I heard you could get some sort of deal in insulation if you didn't have enough.

They did all sorts of measurements and calculations and finally told me I'd be able to save "up to" £27 a year if I increased it to 6". At my expense, naturally.

The fibreglass alone would cost about ten times that. And I'd need to empty the loft (!!), and re-engineer the loft flooring (because the joists are only 5" deep).

"Maybe the marginal improvement in energy efficiency is not seen worthwhile by the householder in terms of trouble or cost"

No shit, Sherlock.

"and re-engineer the loft flooring (because the joists are only 5" deep)."

Not meaning to distract from the rest of your point (it ain't worth it to most houses), but up here in the frozen north the depth of the rafters is utterly irrelevant. Once you have fill the bays, you just fill'er up on top. I've seen a 24" of blown mineral insulation over 6" rafters.

Of course it makes the place useless for storage and a massive nuisance when you want to go find electrics later (and possibly a fire problem if the electrics are not "insulation contact rated" , but the places here are usually designed around that, and when it's >-30C those problems are less of concern than staying warm.

Given my experience with British houses you have more immediate problems than insulation. If you started with plugging the actual drafts where cold and hot air blow in and out fairly freely, and stopped up the air leakages you'd get a lot more bang per penny than insulation.

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