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Top Plod Pleads Trust Me With Your Data

Trust me, I need to know about your e-mails | The Times (£)

Bernard Hogan-Howe

The police must have access to all modern data. It really is a matter of lives and deaths..

communications data has played a role in every big counter-terrorism operation over the past decade and in 95 per cent of serious organised crime operations. A quarter of Metropolitan Police Service requests for access to data in the past five years have been in murder cases.
However it is not just serious crime where this type of data is invaluable. It is regularly used to tackle criminals whose activities affect the wider community, such as repeat burglars, robbers and drug dealers. Put simply, the police need access to this information to keep up with the criminals who bring so much harm to victims and our society.
Gaining access to communications data is no longer a sophisticated means of gathering evidence. Just as mobile phones, e-mail and social media have become part of our lives, so this kind of work has become part of daily policing....

I fully support public debate about this issue and understand concerns about privacy. That’s why I think it is really important to be clear: I do not see this proposed legislation as being more intrusive than the laws we currently have. Police already have access to communications data; the problem is that for some services it is not currently collected and stored by the service provider.
In the UK we police by consent. This phrase is used often, but I firmly believe in it. That’s why we would use access to any further information responsibly, fairly and proportionately.
The proposed changes do not give police unlimited access to new forms of data. Nor will the police routinely store this information. This is only about ensuring that if and when we do need it, we know the data has been stored by the service providers....

This is not about giving the police or anyone else greater power; it is about giving police access to information that will help us to catch criminals, protect victims and keep the public and our communities safe.
Bernard Hogan-Howe is Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police

It is all about murder and terrorism and then he drops in "

it is not just serious crime where this type of data is invaluable. It is regularly used to tackle criminals whose activities affect the wider community, such as repeat burglars, robbers and drug dealers. Put simply, the police need access to this information to keep up with the criminals who bring so much harm to victims and our society.
Gaining access to communications data is no longer a sophisticated means of gathering evidence. Just as mobile phones, e-mail and social media have become part of our lives, so this kind of work has become part of daily policing"

Routine in other words.

Comments

When was the last time the rights of the victims mattered to the british state? I might have missed something, but criminals tend to keep a low profile. They definitely don't go recording their activities electronically. Sorry, Mr Hogan-Howe, but I simply don't believe your claims. It's been a long time since I trusted the police, and it will probably be a long time before I trust them again.

Ah. The government is not going to keep all data, it is going to make someone else do it. I suppose that is better, rather like the records pawnbrokers keep.

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