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Open Access To Research Results

UK government earmarks £10m for open access publishing | Science | guardian.co.uk

The government has announced £10m in funding for UK academics to publish their research in journals that allow free public access to the material online without a subscription.
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Calls for "open access publishing" have been steadily growing in academic circles, with Dutch commercial publishers Elsevier being boycotted by thousands of academics in protest at perceived profiteering through journal access costs.

The government is adopting a funding model proposed by Finch called "gold" open access, where €“ instead of university libraries subscribing to journals €“ researchers pay commercial publishers or learned societies to publish their research, but access to their results is immediate and unrestricted.

Excellent

Comments

I must ask why this is "excellent"?

One company, Elsevier, stands accused of being rapacious in its trading practices. It might even be true - but it might not.

But what cause is this for the UK Government to blow ten million pounds of taxpayers' money?

Will it do any good? Almost certainly not.

I publish much of my stuff only on my company's website. It is not peer reviewed, but it is what it is, and costs nobody anything to look at it. And they do. And sometimes they reference it in their technical articles that are published in reputable journals!

Some of it appears in Google Scholar: interesting.

The British Library trawls my company's website: also interesting, though that seems, IIRC, to happen through the ('political') blogging rather than the technological contribution.

The best thing the government could do for my technical contribution to society is to lower taxes: take less, provide less (or even the same - useful). Then I would have more money and so spend more time doing what I thought worthwhile, some of which is of societal worth.

The Internet and the World-Wide Web give me this opportunity. If government let that run with no censorship (direct or indirect), everyone would gain. And it would cost nothing from taxpayers' funds!

Best regards

I must ask why this is "excellent"?

One company, Elsevier, stands accused of being rapacious in its trading practices. It might even be true - but it might not.

But what cause is this for the UK Government to blow ten million pounds of taxpayers' money?

Will it do any good? Almost certainly not.

I publish much of my stuff only on my company's website. It is not peer reviewed, but it is what it is, and costs nobody anything to look at it. And they do. And sometimes they reference it in their technical articles that are published in reputable journals!

Some of it appears in Google Scholar: interesting.

The British Library trawls my company's website: also interesting, though that seems, IIRC, to happen through the ('political') blogging rather than the technological contribution.

The best thing the government could do for my technical contribution to society is to lower taxes: take less, provide less (or even the same - useful). Then I would have more money and so spend more time doing what I thought worthwhile, some of which is of societal worth.

The Internet and the World-Wide Web give me this opportunity. If government let that run with no censorship (direct or indirect), everyone would gain. And it would cost nothing from taxpayers' funds!

Best regards

Nigel - I agree, but I think it is a logjam breaking first step in the right direction as well.

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