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Smart Meters At Work

Can the Isle of Wight start a power revolution? | Environment | guardian.co.uk

Energy minister John Hayes gets on the internet, clicks a mouse and instantly turns off the electricity being used to charge up an electric car 15 miles away. At the same time, he can shut down a fridge and a water heater in a house three miles away. History may record his activation this week of a rudimentary smart grid of two buildings on the Isle of Wight as the start of a power revolution which its advocates hope will spread across Britain and vastly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and electricity consumption.

This is what the whole "smart meter" push is about, handing over your on and off switch to the politician in charge of energy so he can mange your demand to match the power his windmills are pushing out.

Comments

What a nightmarish vision of the future - a jobsworth being able to switch off your means of transport, keeping food safe to eat and your heating. It doesn't say whose life he was unplugging, hopefully only his own.

Absolutely right.

They have lost all sense of what they are for. To ensure the basic requirements for society to function. Of course, they still think that is what they are doing. Their vision of basic requirements differs widely from the dicitionary.

Yep, the next instalment in the dystopia is upon us.

They don't seem to have thought this through.

"Energy minister John Hayes gets on the internet, clicks a mouse and instantly turns off the electricity being used to charge up an electric car 15 miles away."

So... anyone who needs to use a car, finds that they can't rely on the mains to charge up their electric vehicle?

They therefore go back to that technology most beloved by the greenies: the internal combustion engine.

Talk about the law of unintended consequences!

This can only work if the appliances have "intelligence" built in, to report back to the smart meter on what sort of thing they are.

No doubt it's already been secretly mandated for all new stuff built after a certain date, but the older gear should be good for a while.

Keep your old radios, your kettles, your toasters, and especially your heaters.

As for computers, I wonder if this system works through an off-line UPS? I bet it doesn't...

So: no personal transport, allow "excess" food to rot, no clothes [or personal] washing... What else, No cooking of lunch, no computer or telly, no electric medical devices. People should be at work during the day {even 3rd-shift workers, retirees, children under five) so shut off the furnaces and air conditioners.

It would be good if I could believe the apparent approval and enthusiasm of the reporter was tongue-in-cheek, but in fact I believe this is a "straight" report of what is seen as a good idea.

.....and meters requiring replacement every 7-10 years,

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